Introduction to ‘The Essential Guide To Teaching Guitar’

The Essential Guide To Teaching GuitarThe following is the introduction to ‘The Essential Guide To Teaching Guitar‘. I am not sure if you have had a chance to read the book yet but take a read of the introduction as it will help to give you an idea of what the book is about and you can then ‘Subscribe to read a FREE copy of the complete book online’.

Introduction
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The 80/20 Principle
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You may or may not be familiar with the 80/20 principle but in short it suggests that 20% of effort produces 80% of  results. E.g. 20% of your marketing will produce 80% of your enrolments or 20% of your students will produce 80% of your profits or 80% of referrals will come from just 20% of your students. In this book my aim was to achieve the same by only including the 20% of my original content for this book. I wanted to include what I believe was the most important and valuable information and remove any filler. So here goes. 
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 Why I wrote this book
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“My great concern is not whether you have failed, but whether you are content with your failure.” – Abraham Lincoln
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When I began teaching guitar as a teen in the 1980’s I was clueless about teaching and business. Sure I could play guitar at a reasonable level but that did not qualify me to automatically become a successful guitar teacher. At that time I thought teaching guitar was simply about showing someone ‘how’ to play the guitar. I believed a guitar teacher was nothing more than an instructor. Prior to the Internet you could get away with this approach because the only real options for learning guitar other than a teacher were friends, videos or books. Teachers were in demand so being average was good enough. 
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When I finished high school I combined working in retail sales and playing in bands with teaching. I ran some local newspaper ads, put posters on noticeboards, flyers in mailboxes, ran ads in school newsletters and generally received a good response.  I was quite excited at the time because I was enrolling new students almost every week. This allowed me to leave my retail sales job and teach from home full time while still in my early 20’s. It all seemed perfect except for one small problem. 
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I was losing students as fast as I was enrolling them. For some reason students would lose motivation motivated after a few months and most dropped out. At the same time I had noticed that my own guitar teacher was fully booked up until 10pm most nights and rarely lost students. I also knew a violin teacher and a piano teacher who kept their students for years. I knew I must have been doing something wrong. 
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This question of why students would quit became somewhat of an obsession for me. I came to realize that real success as a guitar teacher meant a combination of finding new students, keeping those students and of course ensuring those students were ultimately successful. It took over a decade to figure out where I was going wrong but another decade to develop the teaching and business skills to keep students committed. I wrote this book to share my journey. My hope is the lessons I learned along the way through trial and error, books, coaching and some luck will help other guitar teachers avoid similar mistakes. 

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